Author - Karl Pizzey

Safety Alert - Alcohol based hand-sanitiser warning

Safety Alert: Alcohol based hand-sanitiser warning

Safety alert issued below from the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (IOPG).

A safety alert has been issued by IOGP regarding alcohol-based hand sanitisers being used for personal hygiene as per personal hygiene guidelines recommended during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been reported that the hand sanitisers gel can be the cause of first and second degree burns if the gel is not fully dried and the fumes could ignite if exposed to an ignition source.

A recent incident that took place was of an employee who touched a metal surface where a build-up of static had created an ignition source. The result left the employee with first and second degree burns from an almost invisible flame.

What went wrong?

Hand sanitiser gels contain concentrations of alcohol. Once the hand sanitiser is applied, individuals must make sure the gel has suitable time to dry.
In the interest of safety, remember that alcohol vapours can ignite if exposed to an ignition source, such as light switches or cigarette lighters.

Corrective actions and recommendations.

The IOGP have advised corrective actions to help prevent such occurrences again.

  1. When using the alcohol-based hand gel sanitisers, ensure the gel is given suitable time to fully dry/evaporate.
  2. Avoid touching any surface until the gel has fully dried.
  3. If unsure about using the alcohol-based sanitisers, washing hands with hot soapy water has the same effect as the hand gel.

For safety alerts please see the IOGP Safety Alerts https://safetyzone.iogp.org/
A PDF version of the IOGP safety alert can be accessed at the following link https://www.ukchamberofshipping.com/documents/2192/safety_alert.pdf.

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Man Overboard (MOB) smoke and light signals being attached to lifebuoys

Man Overboard (MOB) smoke and light signals being attached to lifebuoys.

Man Overboard (MOB) smoke and light signals on lifebuoys.

Larsens Marine have noticed an increase in the frequency with which we are identifying man overboard (MOB) smoke and light signals being attached to lifebuoys of the incorrect weight. We strongly recommend that owners, operators and ships staff confirm that the lifebuoys attached to MOB signals are of the correct weight.

To do so, simply locate the requirements on the side of the signal device and confirm that the hard stamp of the lifebuoy matches this. 

Man Overboard smoke signal attached to lifebuoys of the incorrect weight.
4.0kg lifebuoy

We are finding MOB Smoke and Light Signals which require a lifebuoy weight of 4Kg being fitted with just 2.5Kg.

It has also been the case that the vessel's 4Kg lifebuoys have been located elsewhere on the vessel, possibly in error following maintenance, or having been stowed away during dry dock periods for example. 

life-saving appliances markings

Please note for the purpose of privacy the name of the vessel and port of registry have been removed from the main image. However under SOLAS Regulation 7 Section 1.4 "Each Lifebuoy shall be marked in block capital of the Roman alphabet with the name of the port of registry of the ship on which it is carried", a copy of the SOLAS can be purchased here.

Retro-reflective material on life-saving appliances

You will be required to comply with the regulations for retro-reflective material. Please see the Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code Under Chapter 1, General , section 1.2.2, .7 "be fitted with retro-reflective material *" (Refer to resolution A.658 (16) for the recommended fitting and use of the retro reflective materials on life-saving appliances.).

Also the Life-saving Appliance (LSA) Code Chapter 2 section 2.1 will set out the lifebuoy specifications

If you are unsure or require assistance with any aspects with regards to the correct fitting of the lifebuoys and Man Overboard (MOB) smoke and light signals , please contact us here at Larsens Marine on 01472 826 820 or drop us a line via our contact form here.

If you require a copy of the Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code 2017 Edition, you can purchase a copy from our book shop here.

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Telemedical Advice Service (TMAS) - Dave Moss Photography

Telemedical Advice Service (TMAS)

MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical advice service (TMAS) for ships at sea

In December 2019, the UK Government MCA released the MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical Advice Service (TMAS) For Ships At Sea to comply with the EU legislation on minimum safety and health requirements. This MGN replaced the previous published and now withdrawn MGN 225 (M+F) Radio medical advice for ships at sea. Below is some extracts from the MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical Advice Service (TMAS) and further information can be found on the link at the bottom of the page.

How do you obtain telemedical advice?

How to obtain telemedical advice (previously MGN 225 (M+F) Radio medical advice for ships at sea -This publication was withdrawn on 19 December 2019 ) when a medical incident or medical emergency arises at sea.

Who is MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical advice service (TMAS) for?

Notice to all Shipowners, Ship Operators and Managers, Masters, Skippers of Fishing Vessels and Pleasure Vessels and all Seafarers .

What it is MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical advice service (TMAS) all about.

This Marine Guidance Note provides information on how to obtain telemedical advice (previously Radio Medical Advice) when a medical incident or medical emergency arises at sea. It explains that contact should first be made with HM Coastguard, who will then put the caller in touch with one of the UK’s designated TMAS providers.

1. European legislation on minimum safety and health requirements for improved medical treatment on board vessels (Council Directive 92/29/EEC) requires Member States to designate one or more centres to provide telemedical advice to ships. For the UK, the officially designated providers are at Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth and at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

2. Telemedical advice is available free of charge to provide support in cases where an individual suffers either illness or an accident at sea. The advice is intended to supplement the first aid training of the ship’s crew and the written guidance that is available, such as the Ship’s Captain’s Medical Guide (SCMG), and may also be necessary to support the person in charge of medical care on board the vessel through a medical procedure.

How do i access medical advice?

To obtain telemedical advice Masters and Skippers should first contact HM Coastguard. Contact should be made on either MF DSC, VHF DSC or VHF Channel 16. GMDSS compliant satellite voice communications systems, or mobile phones, can be used for medical advice or assistance, but should not be relied upon as the only means of communication. The telephone numbers to contact HM Coastguard are +44 344 3820026 and +44 208 3127386.

Urgent calls for assistance may be broadcast using the normal Urgency prowords "PAN PAN " as follows :

  • "PAN PAN" x3
  • "All Stations" x3 OR
  • Individual Coastguard / Coast Station x3 (If name known)
  • "This is [ship name]" x3
  • "Call Sign ………."
  • "MMSI …….." "I require medical advice"
  • "Over"

For the full M Notice click here

For more information on the MGN 623 (M+F) Telemedical Advice Service (TMAS) For Ships At Sea you can contact the Seafarer Safety & Health Branch at the Maritime and Coastguard Agency,

Published: December 2019 by the MCA, Southampton. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

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FISHING VESSEL AARON & MELISSA II (NTSB 2019)

FISHING VESSEL AARON & MELISSA II SINKS IN THE GULF OF MAINE

Fishing vessel Aaron & Melissa II sinks in the Gulf of Maine, 70 nautical miles southeast of Portland. (NTSB accident ID DCA19FM006.)

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released a Marine Accident Brief about the November 2018, flooding and sinking of the fishing vessel Aaron & Melissa II approximately 70 miles southeast of Portland, Maine, while transiting to fishing grounds during a storm with gale-force winds. 

The 76.2 ft (23.22 m), steel-built fishing vessel  had 4 crew on-board at the time of the incident.
Environmental damage: 3,000 gallons of fuel and lube oil.

“About 0800 local time on November 14, 2018, the fishing vessel Aaron & Melissa II sank approximately 70 miles southeast of Portland, Maine, after it flooded while transiting to fishing grounds during a storm with gale-force winds. All four crew members abandoned ship and entered an inflatable life raft when attempts to dewater the vessel proved unsuccessful; they were later rescued by a US Coast Guard helicopter. One deckhand received minor injuries. Approximately 3,000 gallons of fuel and lube oil were discharged. The loss of the vessel was estimated at $650,000.”

(NTSB 2019)

Looking at the probable cause of the incident the NTSB concluded the following:

“The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the flooding and sinking of the fishing vessel Aaron & Melissa II was the captain’s decision not to return directly to port with forecasted gale-force conditions, combined with the clogged bilge system, which prevented the crew from dewatering the flooded lazarette.”

(NTSB 2019)

As in most incidents you will find multiple contributary factors that when combined can lead to a major incident as in this case, the clogged bilge system along with adverse weather was enough to lead to the vessel sinking.

It is also worth mentioning that the repairs during January 2018 in drydock a doubler was (Second welded plate) added to rectify a problem they had with through hull wastage had likely also been a contributory factor as it was noted that water ingress was seen before and during the storm.

Lessons from this for surveyors would be to ensure that bilge systems are working, and alarms are working when you are surveying the vessels, test all bilge alarms, not just a few. The other thing to think about is, should a double plate really be used as a definitive repair? Or should it have been cropped out and a new steel plate of the same grade and thickness as the original specification been inserted?

Bibliography

National Transportation Safety Board (2019). NTSB accident ID DCA19FM006. Flooding and Sinking of Fishing Vessel Aaron & Melissa II. [Online] Available at : https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/MAB1934.pdf (accessed 04/11/2019).

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A date for your diary regarding Survival craft safety: The IMO have adopted new procedures for the maintenance and inspection of life-saving appliances.

Survival craft safety: SOLAS amendments adopted

A date for your diary regarding Survival craft safety: The International Maritime Organisation have adopted new procedures for the maintenance and inspection of life-saving appliances that will come into force 1st January 2021.

The objective of these Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances
and release gear (the Requirements) is to establish a uniform, safe and documented standard for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of the equipment specified below:

These Requirements shall apply to the maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of:

  • lifeboats (including free-fall lifeboats), rescue boats and fast rescue boats; and launching appliances and on-load and off-load release gear for lifeboats (including primary and secondary means of launching appliances for free-fall lifeboats), rescue boats, fast rescue boats and davit-launched life-rafts.

Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), 96th session, 11-20 May 2016 

The MSC adopted amendments to SOLAS regulations III/3 and III/20 to make mandatory the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear, which were also adopted at the session.  This package of provisions, with an expected entry into force date of 1 January 2020, aims to prevent accidents with survival craft and addresses longstanding issues such as the need for a uniform, safe and documented standard related to the servicing of these appliances, as well as the authorisation, qualification and certification requirements to ensure that a reliable service is provided. The adoption of the amendment and requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair represents the culmination of some ten years work on the issue. The intention is to ensure that seafarers can be confident that they can fully rely on the IMO-mandated life-saving appliances and equipment at their disposal .

Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), 96th session, 11-20 May 2016

For the full RESOLUTION MSC.402(96) - REQUIREMENTS FOR MAINTENANCE, THOROUGH EXAMINATION, OPERATIONAL TESTING, OVERHAUL AND REPAIR OF LIFEBOATS AND RESCUE BOATS, LAUNCHING APPLIANCES AND RELEASE GEAR click here to download the PDF

Need to obtain a copy of the latest copy of SOLAS Consolidated Edition 2014, buy your copy here or if you require this to be delivered outside the United Kingdom please contact us on  +44 (0)1472 826820 or via email [email protected]

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Diploma in Small Craft Surveying -starting 19 November 2019 and Delivered online with the support of leading industry experts

Diploma in Small Craft Surveying

The Diploma in small craft surveying has specifically enabled over 3,000+ participants to specialise in small craft surveying and focuses on vessels up to 24 metres in registered length. The detailed syllabus provides marine surveyors, potential marine surveyors and associated maritime professionals with a qualification that gives them the knowledge to assist personal and professional development.

Over the 12 months of the course you will explore:

  • The topics of specific concern to this part of the industry.
  • The practicalities of surveying smaller vessels.
  • Legislative issues, regulatory bodies, codes and conventions specific to small craft.
  • Technical skills required to preform various survey types.
  • Commercial skills and knowledge required to run a successful surveying business.

In addition, this professional development diploma also assists future surveyors build their subject knowledge, not just from seafaring professionals but from non seafarers that have the academic ability and interest in learning about the surveying of small craft.

When: 19 November 2019
Where: Delivered online with the support of leading industry experts
Duration: 12 months
Qualification: Lloyd’s Maritime Academy Professional Development Diploma, awarded by North Kent College

Ideal for:

  • Captains
  • Chief Engineers
  • Chief Officers / First Officers
  • Directors
  • Managing Directors
  • Marine Surveyors
  • Masters
  • Principal / Ship Owners
  • Self Employed
  • Surveyors
  • Technical Surveyors

10 MODULES AVAILABLE & 4 SPECIALIST MODULES

  • Introduction to Small Craft Surveying
  • Naval Architecture for Small Craft
  • Small Craft Engineering & Systems
  • Stability of Small Craft
  • Small Craft Surveys and Repairs
  • Survey Management and Reporting
  • Health & Safety for Surveyors
  • Marine Law relating to Surveying & Surveyors
  • Marine Insurance for Surveyors
  • Business Skills for the Surveyor
  • SPECIALIST MODULE A: Inland Waterways and Canal Craft
  • SPECIALIST MODULE B: Power Leisure and Sail Leisure Vessels
  • SPECIALIST MODULE C: Fishing Vessels
  • SPECIALIST MODULE D: Small Commercial Craft

KEY INFORMATION

When does it start and how long is the course?
The course is 12 months long and the modules are released online, one every month. The next available start date is 189th November 2019.

What are the entry requirements?
Participants should be able to prove a minimum achievement of A-Level or equivalent plus at least one year of industry experience in a similar or related field. However those without formal qualifications who demonstrate a number of years of relevant industry experience are welcome to apply. Skills in writing in English and academic reports.

How is the course assessed?
The course is assessed through a mixture of written course work and online tests. Written assignments are submitted online and written feedback is provided by the marker.

How much does it cost?
Please go online to www.lloydsmaritimeacademy.com/scs and see the fees page for full details. An interest-free instalment plan is available. Please contact Lloyd's Maritime Academy for further information.

How is the course assessed?
The course is assessed through a mixture of written course work and online tests. Written assignments are submitted online and written feedback is provided by the marker.

How much does it cost?
Please go online to www.lloydsmaritimeacademy.com/scs and see the fees page for full details. An interest-free instalment plan is available. Please contact Lloyd's Maritime Academy for further information.

Recognised by the The Society of Consulting Marine Engineers and Ship Surveyors (SCMS) as contributing to an individual member’s CPD requirements.Recognised by the The Society of Consulting Marine Engineers and Ship Surveyors (SCMS) as contributing to an individual member’s CPD requirements.

institute of marine engineering science and technology Recognised by the Institute of Marine Engineering Science and Technology (IMarEST) as contributing to an individual member’s CPD requirements.

Recognised by RINA as contributing to CPD requirementsRecognised by The Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) as contributing to CPD requirements

Recognised by the The Society of Consulting Marine Engineers and Ship Surveyors (SCMS) as contributing to an individual member’s CPD requirements.

Lloyd’s Maritime Academy are partnered with The Society of Consulting Marine Engineers and Ship Surveyors (SCMS) and as a student who has successfully passed their Small Craft Surveying Diploma course you could,

  • Receive 50% off SCMS membership fee for new members who have completed the Diploma in Small Craft Surveying in the year of application
  • Receive 20% off SCMS membership for existing members who have completed the Diploma in Small Craft Surveying as part of their CPD in the year of doing the course

Visit the SCMS website for more information.

IN-COMPANY TRAINING

Cut costs while improving performance!
Ensuring a good return on your training investment is critical for all our clients and, whether delivered by distance learning or instructor led workshops, Larsens Marine Surveyors & Consultants can deliver the best training, at a competitive price and from a reliable partner.

At Larsens Marine Surveyors & Consultants we can provided training staff who are not only well versed, qualified and experienced in the training subject but who have also taken further external training known as “train the trainer”. Our trained staff have presented training material around the world including sessions in Europe, Scandinavia, Asia, America and the Far East to audiences as large as 300+ people and as small as a single company training session of just a few attendees. For further information take a look at our classroom based maritime courses, not sure the classroom is suitable then why not look at our training workshops solutions where Larsens Marine Surveyors & Consultants (LMSC) provide training workshops to address current topics and areas of concern to the marine industry. These training workshops are presented in a similar manner to classroom based courses but involve a greater level of interaction from the attendees and less direct lecture type material. Debates, discussions, guest speakers and hands on demonstrations all contribute to a productive outcome which benefits employees and employers not only in the aspects of education and training but also in professional networking whilst being able to openly and frankly discuss the various topics of the day.

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Confined Space Safe Practice (IACS Rec 72)

IACS Confined Space Safe Practice (IACS Rec 72)

Recommendation No. 72 - Rev.3 Dec 2018

This is an essential guide to best practice for confined space entry, providing details of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), safe entry policies and procedures, general hazards and atmosphere testing. Compiled by IACS, Confined Space Safe Practice contains detailed recommendations on all aspects of entering enclosed spaces safely. Covering topics such as safety entry procedures, atmosphere testing, PPE and general hazards, this guide to industry best practice also includes comprehensive additional guidelines and a handy checklist that can be used on board.

What is a confined Space?

"Confined space means a space that has any of the following characteristics:

  • limited openings for entry and exit;
  • unfavourable natural ventilation;
  • not intended for continuous worker occupancy.
    It may include, but is not limited to, boilers, pressure vessels, cargo spaces (cargo holds or
    cargo tanks), cargo space stairways, ballast tanks, double bottoms, double hull spaces, fuel
    oil tanks, lube oil tanks, sewage-tanks, pump-rooms, compressor rooms, cofferdam"

[Confined Space Safe Practice, Recommendation No. 72 - Rev.3 Dec 2018, Part one - Confined Space practices definitions, section 1.1, IACS Rec. 2000/Rev.3 2018 page 3]

What are the general hazards of a confined space?

Entry to and working within confined spaces presents the possibility of fatalities, severe
injuries and illness. The key hazards associated with confined spaces are:

  • serious risk of fire or explosion;
  • loss of consciousness from asphyxiation arising from dust, gas, fumes, vapour or lack
    of oxygen;
  • drowning arising from increased fluid levels;
  • loss of consciousness arising from a change in body temperature;
  • asphyxiation or suffocation arising from free flowing solid (engulfment) or the inability to
    reach a breathable atmosphere due to entrapment.

Surveyors will routinely enter confined spaces that are difficult to access due to small and/or narrow openings. There may be physical constraints within the space which must be considered, and the dimensions of the space itself may allow only restricted mobility. Given the usual enclosed and darkened nature of a confined space this activity ideally should not be carried out by personnel suffering from phobias (such as claustrophobia) or who are susceptible to panic or anxiety attacks.

[Confined Space Safe Practice, Recommendation No. 72 - Rev.3 Dec 2018, Part one - Confined Space practices definitions, section 2, IACS Rec. 2000/Rev.3 2018 page 4]

What is included in the document?

1 General
1.0 Guidelines for Safe Entry of Confined Spaces.
2 Confined Space Hazards
2.1 Hazardous atmospheres from the containment in tank
2.1.1 Oxygen deficient atmosphere
2.1.2 Flammable atmospheres
2.1.3 Toxic atmospheres
2.2 Work being performed in a confined space
3 Testing
3.1 General
3.2 Testing instruments
4 Ventilation
5 Isolation of space
6 General and physical hazards
6.1 Temperature extremes
6.2 Engulfment hazards
6.3 Noise
6.4 Falling objects
6.5 Slick/wet surfaces
7 Guidelines for use of personal gas detectors
7.1 Function test and full calibration
8 Survey preparation
8.1 Cleaning
8.2 Lighting
ANNEX - Checklist for Entry into Confined Spaces

For more information please see link: http://www.iacs.org.uk/publications/recommendations/61-80/rec-72-rev3-cln/

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Newly elected President of SCMS 2019

Newly elected President of SCMS

At the Annual General Meeting of the Society of Consulting Marine Engineers & Ship Surveyors (SCMS), held on 11th June 2019, Allan Larsen was duly elected as President of the Society.

Allan Larsen CEng,CMarEng,FRINA,FIMarEST
Managing Director at Larsens Marine Surveyors & Consultants Ltd and , Director and President of Society of Consulting Marine Engineers & Ship Surveyors (SCMS),

Allan has served a two year period as Vice President and will hold the position of President for twelve months. 
Mr Nick Gladwell becomes the Immediate Past President and Mr Marcus Lankford becomes Vice President. 

In his inaugural speech Allan thanked the Immediate Past President for setting a exemplary example as President. Allan also thanked the staff of the SCMS , the council and the committees which all contribute to the success of the society. 
In this month , June 2019, the SCMS reaches it's 25th year as a Certifying Authority of the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) and, in March 2020 the society will reach it's 100th anniversary. A great achievement on both counts. 

Allan discussed the modern era in which the society represents marine professionals and the maritime industry  and, commented on the fact that today, professional people tend not to attend meetings or industry social events such as dinners, in the numbers which they used to. This means that the society must modernise its approach to its important role in order to continue to meet the demands of clients and members, how we do this, says Allan, is important and will require careful consideration. 

Reflecting on the increasing number of members in the society Allan highlighted why he himself had become a member in 2013. He explained that leaving a large Classification Society at that time was a concern and that he wanted to find a way of bringing a level of confidence to future customers of his own . Having researched various options, the SCMS, with its interest in both small craft and large ships, seemed to be most suitable . He added that upon being accepted as a member of the SCMS he never for a minute imagined that in the not too distant future he would become Vice President and, President - but that he was very happy indeed to have been elected to these roles. 

In closing Allan commented that he would like the SCMS to continue for another hundred years and that he looked forward to playing his part in the future of the society.

Society of Consulting Marine Engineers & Ship Surveyors (SCMS)

Background history of the Society

In late 1919 a number of distinguished Marine Consultants in the UK considered that their profession would benefit from the creation of an appropriate professional Society to set standards and represent the active practitioners in the field. In March 1920 the Society was legally established as a professional body after the agreement of a Memorandum and Articles of Association.

The founders intended that it should be an association of experienced and established professionals who would be committed to the pursuit of excellence in the execution of their professional expertise. The Society represents an identifiable source of expertise and experience in maritime affairs through the high quality of its membership.

Aims and objectives of the Society

SCMS

The Society of Consulting Marine Engineers & Ship Surveyors was founded to provide a central organisation for Consulting Marine Engineers, Naval Architects and Ship Surveyors. The aims and objectives of the Society include:

  • The provision of a central organisation for those engaged in technical maritime affairs.
  • The supervision, promotion and protection of the mutual interests of the Society's members.
  • To encourage improved methods of surveying and drawing up of reports in line with developments and technology.
  • To improve and foster in commercial circles a higher sense of importance of ship and engine surveys and to encourage a greater degree of efficiency in those engaged in the same.
  • To provide opportunities for discussion amongst members and to give facilities for the reading of papers, the delivery of lectures and for the acquisition and dissemination, by other means, of useful information connected with the profession.

One of the principal objectives of the Society has been to ensure that its members have both the academic qualifications and the practical experience necessary for the proper execution of the professional services they offer. This objective is secured by requiring applicants for membership to submit a detailed CV and application form. The application is required to be supported and sponsored by two Members or Fellows of the Society having personal knowledge of the applicant. All applicants are approved by the Society's Council which is the final arbiter in the process.

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COMPA is a method for repair and reinforcement of damaged structures and pipes using composite materials.

Repair and reinforcement of damaged structure with COMPA

Larsens Marine Surveyors & Consultants Ltd (UK)  and COMPA (Croatia) recently entered into an agreement which will provide the ship repair market with a new and effective combined service.

COMPA is a method used for the repair and reinforcement of damaged structure and pipes using composite materials. Within this agreement the two companies will work together to provide these repairs and also to assist in ensuring compliance with the classification and statutory matters related to this. 

COMPA Repairs is a result of extensive experience in ship design and engineering.

COMPA repairs can provide watertight repairs, restore strength , prevent corrosion and reduce crack growth.

COMPA Repairs is a multi-phase process starting with the damage inspection and ending with the patch decommissioning. The patch design phase utilises specialised engineering software tools that enable optimum patch design and customised application procedure.

BENEFITS OF COMPA REPAIRS AND REINFORCEMENTS

  • Cost-efficient compared to traditional repairs
  • Safe, no hot works involved
  • Done during voyage or port operations
  • Applicable to anything reachable by hand
  • Applicable to any shape
  • Durable patch is resistant to osmosis
  • High-pressures, salt, dust, mud or liquids do not pose a challenge
  • Low added weight

The method features application of carbon and glass fibres mixed with epoxy resin/adhesive onto a damaged surface. By curing, the resin hardens and bonds to the surface permanently, impregnating also the fibres that reinstate the strength of the damaged part. It creates a solid new layer of material that provides full water-tightness.

 For further details please contact [email protected]

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Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) 2019

Marine Information Notice from PARIS, TOKYO AND BACK SEA MOUs - 2019 CONCENTRATED INSPECTION CAMPAIGN (CIC) 2019

Concentrated inspection campaign
Concentrated inspection campaign

During the TOKYO MOU 29th committee meeting held in Hangzhou China between 5-8 November 2018 the committee agreed to the joint Paris MOU Concentrated inspection campaign CIC 2019

Decisions of the TOKYO MOU committee was as follows:

The Committee has considered and approved the general arrangements and preparations for the joint Concentrated inspection campaign (CIC) with the Paris MoU on Emergency Systems and Procedures to be carried out in 2019.

“The Committee approved the questionnaire for the CIC on Emergency Systems and Procedures to be carried out jointly with the Tokyo Memorandum of Understanding on port state control. The CIC aims at ensuring compliance with the requirements for the preparation of emergency equipment and the crew’s ability to respond to emergency situations. The CIC will be carried out from September to November 2019 and the questionnaire will be published in August.”

[Paris MOU, The Paris MoU holds 52nd Committee Meeting in St. Petersburg, 22nd May 2019 https://www.parismou.org/paris-mou-holds-52nd-committee-meeting-st-petersburg accessed 24-05-2019] Paris MOU press release: https://www.parismou.org/system/files/Press%20Release%20-%2052nd%20Paris%20MoU%20PSC%20Committee%20-%2020%20May%202019.pdf

The Committee considered possible topics for future CICs and agreed to accept the proposal by the Paris MoU for carrying out a CIC on Stability in General in 2020.
The Committee further considered and approved the amendments to the policy on joint CIC, which is harmonised with that of the Paris MoU.

Looking for more information on SOLAS or other publications? Take a look at some of our IMO publications here

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Due to the current closure of the IMO, some orders may be delayed. Please enquire at [email protected] prior to purchase.